7.13.2014

Wow. What does vivid look like?


I went out for a walk this afternoon. The lake that runs through the middle of downtown was buzzing with paddle boarders, kayakers and rowing sculls. Even though we were scraping 100 degrees the hike and bike trail was filled with walkers, joggers and serious runners. The clouds were doing that dramatic against bright blue sky thing that's getting rarer as the ozone gets thicker or richer or whatever it does. 

I had a new (to me) Olympus OMD EM-5 over my shoulder, complete with a Sigma 30mm f2.8 DN lens and I was eager to put the combo through their daylight paces. The day was so much about a mid-summer, Technicolor(tm) reality that I just had to switch the camera's color profile from natural to vivid. These images are the result. I think I'll call it "The Ken Rockwell Technique."

I hope you had a wonderful weekend lazing about and diving into a great novel. 








15 comments:

Ananda Sim said...

Wait till you try i-Enhance :)

Mike Shwarts said...

Looks like that lovely effect of slightly underexposed chromes. I like it.

Frank Grygier said...

Not sure if I recognize this photographer.

Markus said...

Do Texas sceneries need this? Nah...

Image #2 is the only one where this "vivid" saturation is o.k. for me, otherwise it leaves that aftertaste of oversweetened fast food :(

Dwight Parker said...

All great IMHO......

Dave Jenkins said...

Can you spell V-E-L-V-I-A?

Joseph Ferrari said...

Nice shots! Nice color!

I hope Olympus adds better video to the next iteration of the E-M5.

Anonymous said...

Great captures as always. Love the reflection on to the bridge in the last one. Is it my device (Nexus 5) or do the shots look fuzzy until you open separately. Something about the in line display maybe. Thanks for sharing!

Patrick Dodds said...

That last one is a beauty.

Kirk Tuck said...

I declare the Olympus EM5 to be the perfect postcard camera.

David said...

I especially like #2 (tree trunks and lake) and the last one. I'm not positive but I don't think you can claim you used the Ken Rockwell technique unless you also specify that they were all shot hand held shots.

Jeff said...

If I could add my F-1 with motor drive or T70 sound to my E-M5, like making a song a ring tone, I'd stop switching between my F-1 & T70 with Ektar 100 and E-M5. Would probably need a subwoofer to go with it's tinny speaker to get the real sound effect.

Ron Zack said...

Olympus cameras since the E-1 have ALL been the perfect "post card" cameras with those rich, luxurious colors. My favorites were those with the 10mp and 12mp Panasonic sensors--the colors were always about as good as you could ever want strait from the camera. A little processing in Lightroom or PS made them even better.

Anyway, here's an idea for you now that you have TWO Olympus EM5's: get yourself one of the golden oldie's from the Olympus 4/3 lens catalog, the 14-54mm f/2.8-3.5 Mk II zoom. If you can find one used somewhere, snatch it up and get an nice 4/3 to micro 4/3 adapter to go with it.

The Mk II version of that zoom works very well with micro 4/3 bodies, as it used dual CDAF / PDAF focusing. Face detection also works great with that zoom. The original version of that lens, the Mk I, only uses PDAF, which the EM5 doesn't like very much. That's a shame, because the used Mk I versions are as cheap as a kit lens.

I think you'll find that Mk II zoom to hold up extremely well to the Lumix 12-35 and the Sigma primes you already have. And it's weather & dust sealed, just like your EM5's, which is nice to know if you should ever bring it out to a dust ravaged place like west Texas. And for a 28-104mm equiv. f/2.8 zoom, it's surprisingly small and light, but very well made.

David Mantripp said...

I certainly enjoyed a great novel, by some guy called Kirk Tuck :-)

Paul Glover said...

Shades of John Hinde here with that color.